Confidence in the government on foreign issues has largely recovered

0

Story Highlights

  • 45% trust the US government to handle international issues, up six points
  • Confidence to deal with domestic issues mostly unchanged at 40%
  • Independents responsible for building confidence to handle foreign issues

WASHINGTON, DC — Americans’ trust in the federal government to handle international issues has largely recovered since last year’s record high after US troops withdrew from Afghanistan. The current 45% of American adults who express “a lot” or “somewhat” confidence in the government’s handling of foreign affairs is up six percentage points from a year ago, when it fell nine points.

Meanwhile, the 40% of Americans with the same level of confidence in the government’s handling of domestic issues is essentially unchanged near the low point of the trend.

###Incorporate###

Since 1972, when Gallup first measured Americans’ confidence in the federal government’s ability to deal with domestic and foreign issues, confidence in the government’s handling of international issues has generally exceeded domestic issues. Over the trend, 60% of American adults on average had a great deal or somewhat of a high level of confidence in the government’s handling of international issues, compared with 53% expressing the same level of confidence in the handling of domestic issues.

The majority of Americans trusted the government to deal with foreign issues until 2013. But over the past 10 years, that trust has only been more than half once — 52% in 2017. When it comes to domestic issues, the majority have not always felt confident in the government’s ability to deal with them since 2006, although 51% did so in 2009 and 2012.

Historically, the low point for public confidence in the government’s handling of domestic issues is slightly worse than the all-time low for international issues. The domestic rating plunged to 35% in 2019 at the end of the longest government shutdown in US history, while the international rating was recorded at 39% last year.

Supporters’ confidence strongly influenced by the president’s party

Americans’ confidence in the federal government’s handling of international and domestic issues diverges sharply along partisan lines and has changed when the president’s party changes. In other words, when a Democratic president is in the White House, strong majorities of rank-and-file Democrats express confidence in the government’s handling of international and domestic issues. The reverse is the case when a Republican is in power. For their part, the confidence levels of the independents are more stable than those of the two major parties.

The latest reading, from a Gallup poll from September 1-16, finds that 74% of Democrats, 46% of Independents and 19% of Republicans trust the government to handle international issues. Last year, after Joe Biden took over as president, Republican confidence fell 70 points to a record low of 15%, while Democratic confidence jumped 49 points to 75%.

Current readings for Republicans and Democrats are essentially unchanged from a year ago, but independents’ confidence rose 14 points, driving the overall increase.

###Incorporate###

Supporters’ confidence in the government’s handling of domestic issues, which also reversed last year after Biden took office, is statistically similar to 2021 readings. Currently, 73% of Democrats, 36% of Independents and 17% of Republicans express confidence in the government’s ability to solve national problems.

###Incorporate###

Conclusion

Americans’ confidence in the government in Washington to handle international and domestic issues remains at the lower end of the trend, although their confidence in the federal government to handle issues abroad has increased somewhat over the past year. past year. Supporters’ views on the government’s competence in these two areas remain politically polarized, with prospects determined by whether their own party matches that of the incumbent president.

To stay up to date with the latest information and updates from Gallup News, Follow us on twitter.

Learn more about how the Gallup Poll Social Series works.

See complete answers to questions and trends (PDF download).

Share.

Comments are closed.